Our Facilities

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The first half of the Wooster Tree Ring Lab, contains our largest Nikon Boom microscope, 2 Apple computers, along with a 24 inch Velmex measuring table (.001mm precision), a quick chek display, dual gooseneck fiber-optic lights, and a storage of processed logs.

The Wooster Tree Ring Lab, starting in what was once a small office in the basement of Scovel Hall, has now spread into three areas including the sanding room, tree-ring annex, and the main lab. The lab and annex are equipped with three zoom dissecting microscopes, Velmex measuring tables, and storage space for tools and samples. Equipment in the lab is for the collection and preparation of wood and sediment samples. Such tools include increment borers, chainsaws, belt sanders, electric drills and various lake and bog coring equipment. We mainly work with living old-growth oaks and beams from historical structures in Northeast Ohio and Alaskan glacier preserved subfossil logs. In addition to the work with wood we core and analyze sediment records from bog and lakes in Ohio.

Back Wall

The backwall of the Tree Ring Lab consists of the 2nd measuring station with 2 Apple Mac's. This backwall also houses a Mac Powerbook G4, field notebooks from Alaska, relavent publications, and wood samples from Alaska.

Socioscope

This is the third measuring station, it is outfitted with a 24 inch velmex table, a Nikon boom microscope, fiber optic lights, and 2 apple macintosh computers. In the foreground are samples collected from a tornado that ripped through Wooster in November 2004. These samples were from a local elementary school that had an old growth oak grove.

Socioscope

The two shelving units (left and center) house cores that have been processed. In front of the shelves is a large toolbox we use to haul our historical structure dating tools, this toolbox includes 2 drills, a reciprocating saw, batteries, 5 dry wood borers, and other accessories for collecting samples. In the background is one of our storage closests that contains our increment borers, sandpaper for the stationary belt sanders, and a fraction of our camping gear we use for Alaska.

Back Wall

This wall is filled with glacier killed logs from Columbia Bay in Southcentral, Alaska. This plethora of log samples is one of the reasons for the Tree Ring Annex.

Annex

This lab is mainly used for lake sediment cores, but has been encroached upon by logs that have no place to go. We call this lab the Tree Ring Annex, this lab holds 20,000 year old logs from Sharonville, Ohio, as well as our samples collected from historical structures around Northeast Ohio. On the other side of the lab is our third measuring station.

Socioscope

Our Preparation/Saw Room, This is shared with the rest of the Geology Dept. (a Rototap is in the left corner) as a saw room. It houses a bandsaw; a table saw; 2 rock saws; 2 chainsaws (which were put out for visual affect); A large, high speed, stationary belt sander; and a low speed smaller stationary belt sander; along with our workbench and dust collector.